GeekSpeak for 2016-02-27

Thea Cook Archives the FBI’s Encrypted Data Forever

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The future of data storage, and Apple vs. the FBI, plus gender equity on GitHub repos.

This tiny glass disc can store 360TB of data for 13.8 billion years

Now researchers in the UK just might have the solution: a five-dimensional (5D) digital data disc that can store 360 terabytes of data for some 13.8 billion years.

To create the data disc, researchers from the University of Southampton used a process called femtosecond laser writing, which creates small discs of glass using an ultrafast laser that generates short and intense pulses of light. These pulses can write data in three layers of nanostructured dots separated by 5 micrometres (that’s 0.005 mm).

Intel, Micron To Soon Birth 10TB SSDs For Enterprise

Intel and Micron have been tag-teaming various storage and memory technologies, like 3D XPoint (pronounced “cross point”) memory, and word on the web is that the fruits of that partnership is a 10-terebyte SSD that’s right around the corner

Tim Cook's Open Letter

The United States government has demanded that Apple take an unprecedented step which threatens the security of our customers. We oppose this order, which has implications far beyond the legal case at hand. 

This moment calls for public discussion, and we want our customers and people around the country to understand what is at stake.

Women write better code, study suggests

The US researchers analysed nearly 1.4 million users of the open source program-sharing service Github.
bq. They found that pull requests – or suggested code changes – made on the service by women were more likely to be accepted than those by men.

Even on eBay, women get paid less for their labor

Women in the United States are paid only 79 cents on the dollar compared with men doing the same job. But at least gender melts away in the digital economy of the Internet, right? Nope. A study of more than 1 million auctions on the online commerce site eBay finds that women receive consistently less money than men for selling the very same products.