GeekSpeak for 2014-12-06

Feeling Video of the Police with AI

Advertising security might represent less secure sites, eyewitness not at good as video, Target targeted by banks ok, and more geeky week news.

Sites certified as secure often more vulnerable to hacking, scientists find

Security seals aren’t worth the bits they’re made of, let alone the fees.

Judge rules that banks can sue Target for 2013 credit card hack | Ars Technica

On Tuesday, a District Court judge in Minnesota ruled that a group of banks can proceed to sue Target for negligence in the December 2013 breach that resulted in the theft of 40 million consumer credit card numbers as well as personal information on 70 million customers. The banks alleged that Target had “failed to heed warning signs” that would have stymied the banks’ losses.

Why do we cling to beliefs when they’re threatened by facts?

People hold beliefs for a complex variety of reasons. Some of these beliefs may be based on facts, but others may be based on ideas that can never be proved or disproven. For example, people who are against the death penalty might base their belief partly on evidence that the death penalty does not reduce violent crime (which could later be shown to be false), and partly on the notion that the death penalty violates a fundamental human right to life. The latter is an unfalsifiable belief, because it can’t be changed purely by facts.

The Misinformation Effect and Eyewitness Accounts

Many studies have been done that have shown that eyewitness accounts are not always accurate. There are many reasons why this is true, but the one that intrigues social psychologists the most is when eyewitnesses believe that they remember what they saw but are wrong. Why would someone remember seeing someone driving a car involved in a hit-and-run, for example, even though that person is somewhere on the opposite side of town?

PhotoMath Is A Free App That Can Solve Equations Through Smartphone Cameras - NSays.in

PhotoMath may sound like it is simply helping kids cheat, but the app also provides a step-by-step guide showing how each of the problems are solved. The step-by-step guide is beneficial to students that do not have access to a tutor and struggle with solving math problems. Parents can also use the PhotoMath app to jog their memory when teaching math to their kids.

Cortana on Windows 10, Microsoft's virtual assistant

While an obvious response to Apple’s Siri, Microsoft’s devotion to Cortana is also a reminder of just how important these virtual assistants are becoming. It’s as if Siri, Google Now, and Cortana will end up personifying the operating system wars.

See it, touch it, feel it

Technology has changed rapidly over the last few years with touch feedback, known as haptics, being used in entertainment, rehabilitation and even surgical training. New research, using ultrasound, has developed a virtual 3D haptic shape that can be seen and felt.

New York City libraries soon will let patrons ‘check out the Internet’ - The Washington Post

New York City is expanding a program that allows local residents with a library card to take home broadband Internet hotspots — sometimes for up to a year.

Seattle To Provide Tent Cities With Internet So Homeless People Can Communicate, Look For Jobs

The Seattle City Council voted on Monday to approve a new city budget that includes money that could be used to provide Internet access at some of the city’s dozens of homeless encampments.

The SSD Endurance Experiment: Two freaking petabytes

The last victim fell at 1.2PB, which is barely a speck in the rear-view mirror for our remaining subjects. The 840 Pro and a second HyperX 3K have now reached two freaking petabytes of writes. To put that figure into perspective, the SSDs in my main desktop have logged less than two terabytes of writes over the past couple years. At this rate, it’ll take me a thousand years to reach that total.

Mark Zuckerberg attacks Apple's CEO Over Comments About Customers

In a new Time magazine profile, an irritated Zuckerberg is slamming Cook for a letter he wrote regarding Apple’s evolving privacy policies last September. “A few years ago,” wrote Cook at the time, “users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product.”

We here at GeekSpeak kinda lean to the whole “commercials are the customer”. Here we don’t do commercials, so we think of you as the customer.