GeekSpeak for 2012-08-18

Editors, Keyboards, and Ctrl-V

Ben talks about what he teaches at DMA and the Michael Bale touch. The Geeks yack on about radio tech support, google docs sharing, coding on an iPad, and even some Geek News!
DNA data storage? Miles tries to explain sizes. Curiosity videos and much more.

DNA: The Ultimate Hard Drive

In a new study, researchers stored an entire genetics textbook in less than a picogram of DNA—one trillionth of a gram—an advance that could revolutionize our ability to save data.

Ben works at... The Digital Media Academy

Summer computer camps for kids ages 6-18, course in game design, 3D, film, web & more at leading universities.

MIT-developed ‘microthrusters’ could propel small satellites

A penny-sized rocket thruster may soon power the smallest satellites in space.

The device, designed by Paulo Lozano, an associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT, bears little resemblance to today’s bulky satellite engines, which are laden with valves, pipes and heavy propellant tanks. Instead, Lozano’s design is a flat, compact square — much like a computer chip — covered with 500 microscopic tips that, when stimulated with voltage, emit tiny beams of ions. Together, the array of spiky tips creates a small puff of charged particles that can help propel a shoebox-sized satellite forward.

“They’re so small that you can put several [thrusters] on a vehicle,” Lozano says. He adds that a small satellite outfitted with several microthrusters could “not only move to change its orbit, but do other interesting things — like turn and roll.”

Colour printing reaches its ultimate resolution

The highest possible resolution images — about 100,000 dots per inch — have been achieved, and in full-colour, with a printing method that uses tiny pillars a few tens of nanometres tall.