GeekSpeak for 2008-11-29

GeekSpeak Rick Rolled

Rick Astley [rick rolls|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rickrolling] the New York Thanksgiving Parade and more GeekNews.

iPhone Not Fast Enough for Commercial

Unlike the US, the UK doesn’t seem to look kindly on demonstrations of a product that do match reality.

Luminous Tablecloth

Light up your dining experience with luminous tablecloth.

Sad, Dying Flower

The Wilting Flower from English designer Carl Smith changes from blue, to red, to yellow, to purple, then off, as power demands increase. As it changes, the petals slowly close and the flower tilts over in its vase.

Nanotech Polyester Never Gets Wet

Where’s my new raincoat?

Gaming the Next Pandemic

The Department of Defense (DOD) has commissioned the development of a simulation-based planning and training software application to help it to prepare for the next influenza pandemic.

Google's iPhone App

Google’s hot new voice-powered search, available through the App Store, violated Apple’s rules. The Apple iPhone’s developer agreement which comes with the Software Development Kit given to Google and others has many strict provisions, which are often broken by developers. One of these provisions is that apps can only use the APIs provided in the SDK and cannot use “private code” — Apple’s unreleased APIs.

Laptop Text of Death

Lenovo is using text messaging to add an additional layer of security to the company’s line of ThinkPad notebooks. Starting in 2009, Lenovo ThinkPad notebook users can use an SMS text message to shut down a laptop that has been stolen or has been lost. This new feature, called Lenovo Constant Secure Remote Disable, was developed in conjunction with Phoenix Technologies to work with the ThinkPad’s BIOS.

Thanksgiving Parade Gets a Live 'Rick Roll'

The annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York got “Rickrolled” on Thursday.

Rick Roll!

I especially like the Barack Roll.

Samsung Upgrades Speed and Capacity of SSDs

Samsung claims the 256[GB|Gigabyte] [SSD|Solid State Device] is more than twice as fast as the 64GB and 128GB versions, combining sequential read rates of 220MB/s (megabytes per second) with sequential write rates of 200MB/s. This performance is enough to store 25 high-definition movies in just 21 minutes and to launch applications 10 times faster than the fastest 7200[rpm|Revolutions Per Minute] notebook hard disk drive. The power consumption of the drive is rated at 1.1 watts.

HD or Standard Def?

A recent survey by the Leichtman Research Group (LRG) shows that 18 percent of [HDTV|High Definition TV] owners think they’re watching high-definition shows, when in fact they’re viewing standard definition programming.


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