GeekSpeak for 2012-04-21

Games to Help Depressed Batteries Go Mach 20

Thousands to lose Internet access due to the FBI, the hardest-working man on Wikipedia, the rest of the Week in Geek, and Lyle and Miles respond to your questions and comments.

User:koavf - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I am Justin Anthony Knapp (koavf), a Wikipedian from Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. I’m a life-long Hoosier, and attended Covenant Christian High School; upon graduating, I worked there as a tutor and teachers’ assistant for two years. I joined Wikipedia on 2005-03-06, after anonymously editing for months. I worked for Indiana University at IUPUI for several years, where I earned degrees in philosophy and political science.

Hypersonic test aircraft flies for 3 minutes at Mach 20

“The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s experimental Hypersonic Technology Vehicle (HTV-2), lost significant portions of its outer skin and became uncontrollable after three minutes of sustained Mach 20 speed last August.”

Computer Game Helps Kids with Depression

“A computer game designed to lift teenagers out of depression is as effective as one-on-one counselling, New Zealand doctors reported on Thursday in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).”

Hardest working man on the internet- one million Wikipedia edits

Justin Knapp is probably the hardest working man on the internet after becoming the first person to pass the million-edit-mark on Wikipedia. Since 2005, he’s made around 385 amendments per day, each one taking him around four minutes [Citation Needed]. Founder Jimmy Wales congratulated the 30-year-old on his personal feed and Mr. Knapp’s been awarded the site’s Special Barnstar medal and Golden Wiki award for his achievement.

FBI: Hundreds Of Thousands May Lose Internet In July

For computer users, a few mouse clicks could mean the difference between staying online and losing Internet connections this summer.

Unknown to most of them, their problem began when international hackers ran an online advertising scam to take control of infected computers around the world. In a highly unusual response, the FBI set up a safety net months ago using government computers to prevent Internet disruptions for those infected users. But that system is to be shut down.

The FBI is encouraging users to visit a website run by its security partner, http://www.dcwg.org , that will inform them whether they’re infected and explain how to fix the problem. After July 9, infected users won’t be able to connect to the Internet.

GeekBit: Too Much Copyright: This Generation's Prohibition

The folks over at ReasonTV have put together a great episode about the state of copyright law today. Hosted by Zach Weissmueller, the video includes three guests. Professor Tom Bell, who is well known for his useful depiction of the insanity of copyright extension via the Mickey Mouse curve, Cheezburger CEO Ben Huh, and the MPAA’s Ben Sheffner.

NameCheap Overtakes Go Daddy | Elliot's Blog

According to the Google Adword Keyword Tool, tens of thousands of people search for the term “domain name” each month (just under 100,000 searches). Go Daddy is the largest domain registrar, with tens of millions of domain names under management, and NameCheap is on its way to 3 million domain names under its control (check out the company’s 3 millionth domain registration contest).

IBM creates breathing, high-density, light-weight li-air battery

“As part of its Battery 500 project — an initiative started by IBM in 2009 to produce a battery capable of powering a car for 500 miles — Big Blue has successfully demonstrated a light-weight, ultra-high-density, lithium-air battery.”